Congregation Tiferes Yisroel

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Congregation Tiferes Yisroel – Beis Dovid
Shul.jpg
Exterior of Congregation Tiferes Yisroel
Religion
AffiliationOrthodox Jewish
LeadershipRabbi Menachem Goldberger
Location
Location6201 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore
StateMaryland
Website
tiferesyisroel.org

Congregation Tiferes Yisroel – Beis Dovid (Hebrew: תפארת ישראל בית דוד‎), also known as Rabbi Goldberger's Shul, is an Orthodox Jewish congregation located at 6201 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, Maryland. The leader of the congregation is Rabbi Menachem Goldberger.

History[edit]

Rabbi Menachem Goldberger

Congregation Tiferes Yisroel was founded in 1986 by twelve families and individuals in Baltimore, who invited Rabbi Menachem Goldberger, a native of Denver, to be their Rabbi.[1][2] The congregation initially met in a private home, hosting 126 people at their first Rosh Hashanah services; after about nine months, when membership had increased to over 70 families, the congregation purchased what had been the B'nai Akiva building in Baltimore.[2] In 1993 the synagogue bought its present home on Park Heights Avenue,[2] into which it moved in 1994.[3] As of its 25th anniversary in 2011, the congregation numbered 140 families.[1]

The congregation is not affiliated with any of the various umbrella Orthodox organizations, but is a Hasidic shtiebel with Haredi leanings.[citation needed] Prayer services are conducted in Nusach Sefard.[3] Goldberger draws his inspiration as a Hasidic rabbi[4][5] from the teachings of Rabbi Shlomo Twerski, of whom he was a close student.[1] The congregation emphasizes music and singing as a vehicle for religious worship.[3] Goldberger has released a compilation of his own, original religious compositions, called L'cha Dodi.[6][7][8]

Other areas of specific emphasis are the importance of family, the Land of Israel, and the lifelong goal of Torah study.[citation needed] The congregation welcomes all Jews, especially those who were not raised in the Orthodox Jewish tradition, such as Baalei teshuva or converts to Judaism.[3][9]

In conjunction with the synagogue's 25th anniversary in 2011, the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore proclaimed March 13, 2011 as "Rabbi Menachem Goldberger Day".[citation needed]

Bitcoin[edit]

In May 2013 Tiferes Yisroel became the only American religious institution to accept bitcoin for dues, donations, and other payments.[10] Over a period of nine months, the synagogue collected 1.98 bitcoins, worth approximately $1,253.[10] The congregation stopped accepting bitcoins in March 2014 following the collapse of the Mt. Gox bitcoin exchange.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The Other Rabbi Goldberger". Intermountain Jewish News. April 22, 2011. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c Gerr, Melissa (September 25, 2013). "'I Will Beautify Him'". Baltimore Jewish Times. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d "Baltimore's Jewish Neighborhoods – Case Study: Park Heights Avenue" (PDF). Jewish Museum of Maryland. p. 14. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  4. ^ "'Day of Focus' Educates and Inspires" (PDF). Batya. XLIII (IV): 2. June 2010.
  5. ^ Jacobs, Phil (May 16, 2003). "A Leader in His Field" (PDF). Baltimore Jewish Times. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  6. ^ "From Hornesteipel to Denver to Baltimore". Heichal HaNegina. September 27, 2005. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  7. ^ "Baltimore Niggunim of Rabbi Menachem Goldberger". Jewish Music Web Center. November 11, 2004. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  8. ^ "Rabbi Menachem Goldberger: L'cha Dodi". AllMusic. 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  9. ^ "Oorah and KirbyCard: Painlessly Paying the Kiruv Bill". Kashrus. Yeshiva Birkas Reuven. 24: 88. 2003.
  10. ^ a b c Alfonso III, Fernando (March 6, 2014). "How Mt. Gox scared off the first and only Bitcoin synagogue". The Daily Dot. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  11. ^ Kaplan, Michael (March 11, 2014). "Bitcoin Bites the Dust at Baltimore Shul After MtGox Goes Bust". The Jewish Daily Forward. Retrieved July 12, 2014.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°21′30″N 76°41′34.5″W / 39.35833°N 76.692917°W / 39.35833; -76.692917