Template talk:Islamic art

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WikiProject Arts (Rated Template-class)
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WikiProject Islam (Rated Template-class)
WikiProject iconThis template is within the scope of WikiProject Islam, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Islam-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 Template  This template does not require a rating on the project's quality scale.
 

This concept should definitely be grown. Right now there are only three articles linked and one isn't even on its own page, but this is definitely a field that could and should be expanded... Feel free to edit this and make it better gren 08:39, 29 May 2005 (UTC)

Also, some of the items linked are Arabic... and Arabic is not Islamic... I do this because there are definite talk of Islamic influence in the article and this template should direct to that information... however, in the future maybe these articles will be expanded enough to warrant the creation of an article for just the Islamic portion. gren 08:43, 29 May 2005 (UTC)

Hmmm[edit]

I don't much like this. Miniatures are not "decorative art" on any definition, and the whole concept of that doesn't work well for Islamic art. That section should be "art" and at 1 or 2. The gardens should not be so high up - really those articles ought to be merged. Normally we use "art" = "visual arts" with "arts" including music and literature. Johnbod (talk) 17:23, 9 December 2015 (UTC)

OK, let's use "arts" then, I was hesitating about it (maybe the template needs to be enamed, indeed). I'll move the miniatures into a new section, and sort the sections alphabetically. Thanks for the feedback. Chiswick Chap (talk) 17:25, 9 December 2015 (UTC)
Personally, I'd rather keep it restricted to "art" - there are a vast number of literature articles that should go in if that is done properly, and imo literature is beast not lumped together as "Islamic" - the Persian, Arabic, Urdu etc traditions are pretty different. A section for "Arts of the Book" might be good - there are lots of articles like Ottoman illumination and muraqqa that belong there. Johnbod (talk) 17:30, 9 December 2015 (UTC)
Yeah, there was lit. there already and I was trying to disturb feelings as little as possible, but it does feel out of place. So do we remove Music also? Some of the artforms span music and poetry, so the distinction is quite fragile. "Art" could also exclude Architecture (as Islamic art does). Chiswick Chap (talk) 17:33, 9 December 2015 (UTC)
I'm fine with architecture being there. Architectural decoration is a big part of Islamic art - far more than in most periods in the West. If we're removing lit, then its not a problem losing song forms etc. You need a group of textile/carpet articles in there. Johnbod (talk) 18:07, 9 December 2015 (UTC)
Super. Architecture can stay, textiles will join. Chiswick Chap (talk) 19:24, 9 December 2015 (UTC)

Kat'i art[edit]

Kat'i art should be added in "Art of the books" segment's "Other arts" part. A brief is given below. Kat'i is the art of stenciling intricate designs into leather or paper. The paper could be a simple one or an Ebru (marbling art) paper. A "nevregen", a small sharp knife was used to carve into the paper and the leather. The process of pasting was done with a mixture called "cirisli muhallebi" in Turkish. This was a mixture of milk, rice flour and book binder's paste. The surface on which the cut-outs were pasted was called "male". Those surfaces on which the cut-outs were directly carved were called "female". Besides simple shapes, complex paper cuts were produced that showed colorful flowers, flower gardens or a landscape, calligraphyc decorations and so on, giving way to three-dimensional images. The origins of this art can be traced back to Iran. In the 15th century delicate and beautifully composed patterns in leather filigree and paper cut-out were practiced with great skills and patience. Ottoman artists, called as "Kati'an", have started used it from 16th century on in order to decorate the bindings of religious and philosophical texts. This art became very popular especially during the times of Suleyman the Magnificent. Kat'i was introduced to Europe around 17th century when western travelers took some examples with them on their journey back home. Unfortunately today there are very few Kat'i masters left; it's an art form which is dying. Cem Altınel (talk) 08:46, 26 January 2020 (UTC)